• Editorial
    • Genes & Diseases,Volume 1, Issue 1,2014, Pages 120-125
    • Molecular basis of cranial suture biology and disease: Osteoblastic and osteoclastic perspectives
    Abstract
    The normal growth and development of the skull is a tightly regulated process that occurs along the osteogenic interfaces of the cranial sutures. Here, the borders of the calvarial bones and neighboring tissues above and below, function as a complex. Through coordinated remodeling efforts of bone deposition and resorption, the cranial sutures maintain a state of patency from infancy through early adulthood as the skull continues to grow and accommodate the developing brain's demands for expansion. However, when this delicate balance is disturbed, a number of pathologic conditions ensue; and if left uncorrected, may result in visual and neurocognitive impairments. A prime example includes craniosynostosis, or premature fusion of one or more cranial and/or facial suture(s). At the present time, the only therapeutic measure for craniosynostosis is surgical correction by cranial vault reconstruction. However, elegant studies performed over the past decade have identified several genes critical for the maintenance of suture patency and induction of suture fusion. Such deeper understandings of the pathogenesis and molecular mechanisms that regulate suture biology may provide necessary insights toward the development of non-surgical therapeutic alternatives for patients with cranial suture defects. In this review, we discuss the intricate cellular and molecular interplay that exists within the suture among its three major components: dura mater, osteoblastic related molecular pathways and osteoclastic related molecular pathways.
    Keywords
    Cranial sutures; Craniosynostosis; Dura mater; Osteoblasts; Osteoclasts
    Copyright © 2014 Chongqing Medical University. Published by Elsevier B.V

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    Maureen Beederman,Evan M. Farina,Russell R. Reid.Molecular basis of cranial suture biology and disease: Osteoblastic and osteoclastic perspectives[J].Genes & Diseases,2014;1(1):120-125.